books, reviews

Book Review: The Broken God – Gareth Hanrahan

Dark gods and dangerous magic clash in this third book of Gareth Hanrahan’s acclaimed epic fantasy series, The Black Iron Legacy. “This is genre-defying fantasy at its very best . . . Insanely inventive and deeply twisted” (Michael R. Fletcher). 

Enter a city of dragons and darkness . . . The Godswar has come to Guerdon, dividing the city between three occupying powers. A fragile armistice holds back the gods, but other dangerous forces seek to exert their influence. Spar Idgeson, once heir to the brotherhood of thieves has been transformed into the living stone of the new city. But his powers are failing and the criminal dragons of the Ghierdana are circling. 

Meanwhile, far across the sea, Carillon Thay—once a thief, a saint, a god killer; now alone and powerless—seeks the mysterious land of Khebesh, desperate to find a cure for Spar. But what hope does she have when even the gods seek vengeance against her? 

“A groundbreaking and extraordinary novel . . . Hanrahan has an astonishing imagination” (Peter McLean). 

My thoughts:

The third book in The Black Iron Legacy hits the ground running, with Cari on the way across the sea looking for a cure for Spar’s slow fading away. But her leaving Guerdon leaves the New City vulnerable to others.

The dragons of Ghierdana have set up shop, as part of the Lyrixian delegation occupying the city and are sinking their claws into the criminal underworld.

I was totally hooked from page one, this series has been one of my favourite of the crop of newer fantasy writers in the last few years. Intelligent fantasy, smart world building with engaging and personable characters. I was really engrossed in the story, Cari develops as a character even further, as she learns more about who and what she is.

The various plot lines start to coalesce as the book heads towards its conclusion, setting up further adventures to come in the next book, which I cannot wait to read.

A big thank you to Orbit Books for sending me a copy of this book.

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