beauty, beauty boxes, fashion, glossybox, haircare, make up, reviews

Glossybox Style Edition

September is a month of Fashion Weeks all over the globe in glamorous locations (New York, London, Milan, Paris…) and Glossybox have themed this month’s box for the most stylish month in the fashion calendar.

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The box is beautifully decorated, and features five full size items to get you ready for the new fashion season.

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Pink and khaki grey are the colours for this autumn and the whole box, including the wrapping, is on this trend.

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Maria Nila Luminous Colour Hair Masque – sulphate and paraben free, 100% vegan, doesn’t smell too bad, suitable for coloured and natural hair, a treat from Sweden. I currently have this soaking into my newly cut hair, which needs a boost to look its best. This also comes with a 20% off voucher for the whole range.

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Invisibobble traceless hair ring – I’ve had long hair, short hair and am the queen of the ponytail at any length. In the last few years more and more companies have produced metal-free, hair friendly bands. These claim to leave no kinks in the hair, or cause any breakage. Definitely something my hair can appreciate. There are three in the box.

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Nails Inc polish in Uptown, there is another colour in some boxes. This is a dusky pink shade, though pink always seems like more of a spring colour. I am however a massive Nails Inc fan so this will be added to the mix.

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Bellapierre Cosmetics Shimmer Powder in Whesek. This greyish powder, with its hint of glitter, is perfect for autumnal smoky eyes.

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Marsk Eyeshadow Brush Pro to complement the shimmer powder, I like the wide, fan shape of this brush for sweeping colour over my lids, plus the brush is super soft.

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This box is incredible value – approximately £60 worth of products for £12.95.

There’s also a £15 voucher for invite only fashion brand Best Secret and a sneak peek of one of next month’s products.

really like this box – it’s very generous and features several brands I already use. The box itself is gorgeous and as sturdy as always – making it perfect for storing your make up or wrapping up for a friend’s present (obviously not an empty box!)

Will you be donning this season’s shades and looking totally on point?

ramblingmads

fashion, fashion friday, jewellery, trend on trial

Trend on trial: midi rings

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A few months ago I lost some weight, and as always it went first in my hands. I already have weird fingers, long and bony with the protruding knuckles all women on my mum’s side have (and one day the joy of arthritis). So the lost weight created a conundrum in my jewellery armoury, my rings were too big.

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I have worn the same rings on my fingers on and off for years – including my great-great-aunt Bess’ ring, which only ever fitted on my thumb.

I like to dress up and the rings I wear are part of my defense against the world.

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So now I’m looking for rings that fit my new, scrawnier fingers. And a trend that caught my eye was the recent one for midi rings, that sit between your fingers joints. EBay and Etsy are excellent places to hunt for things like that. Ring size matters less as these rings are often adjustable or can be moved to a different finger if they aren’t quite right (that and they’re cheap and cheerful).  

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ramblingmads

beauty, body positive, fashion

My two cents: hijabi fashion

I was on Facebook and magazine Volup2 had posted an article about hijabi fashionistas. Of course some idiots in the comments had leapt straight into hate territory (referencing Sharia law, repression of women, being islamophobic etc)

That’s not been my experience, I have plenty of friends and colleagues who are Muslim and incredibly stylish, some of whom cover up more than others.

These women have made choices about their level of coverage, their interpretation of modest dress. Some have gone from merely wearing long sleeves and floor length skirts or trousers to the hijab and more. All by their own choice.

These ladies have scarf collections to die for, beautiful colours, patterns and designer. Just gorgeous. They coordinate their outfits so beautifully too. I wish I had that level of colour combination skill.

Even the ones who choose to wear a burqa over their clothes are often well dressed underneath. It seems like quite a practical garment too. And it’s a personal preference.

All three Abrahamic religions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam) have instructions to dress modestly, but like most religious texts these rules are open to interpretation. If you go to Rome and want to go into a church, your shoulders and knees must be covered, it’s the same in most of Europe and Russia.

Women used to wear hats to church and some still have dress codes. My aunt’s church is quite strict, whereas my mum’s is a lot more relaxed in terms of what you wear on Sunday.

There are similar circumstances in most synagogues, heads must be covered, modest, smart dress is preferred. Some Jewish communities adhere to these rules all the time, others are more relaxed.

I’m sure other religions have dictates about dress, either specifically for worship or for everyday.

So why shouldn’t women who wear a hijab or who cover themselves dress well? Where does it say they can’t enjoy clothes and make up? Yes some countries have strict, enforceable dress codes, but they tend to be in the minority.

These hijabi fashionistas are inspiring younger women who might be worried that wearing the hijab is frumpy or means they have to give up their love of clothes in order to be closer to their faith. They also look amazing. All women should support each other regardless of faith, culture or ethnicity.

If you see someone looking amazing or wearing cute shoes or a fabulous top – tell her. Say ‘I love your shoes’ or ‘you look amazing’, smile, make someone’s day. The world is a cruel, cold place without us pulling each other down or making assumptions without knowing someone first.

ramblingmads